Mundus International began with the insight that the practice of diplomacy was changing. In an era of globalisation, austerity policies and a multipolar diplomatic world, governments were re-evaluating how they were represented and reprioritising the goals for their overseas missions. Simply put, many countries’ embassies were being asked to do more with less. In parallel, the diplomatic services of developing countries were becoming more ambitious in their goals, seeking to learn from and benefit from their relationships with leading donor countries such as Sweden.

Mundus International was founded in light of this changing nature of diplomacy.

Since humble beginnings in 2012, we have built up a very strong client base among embassies in Sweden and of those accredited to Sweden from other countries. And in doing so we have learned that the issue is bigger than politics and diplomacy. Although small in population, Sweden punches above its weight in politics and business. A trendsetter that others look to to monitor where the future lies, be it in how society manages the challenges of having a competitive economy, but broad social support for those who need it, IT-innovation, clean tech or fashion. But despite this, there is a dearth of English-language news and analysis available to digest easily. Mundus International is filling this gap.

Mind the gap

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This means that for the tens of thousands of expatriates who have come to Sweden there is a serious gap between what they need to know about the society, culture and politics and what they can easily access. Over the course of 2016, we have updated our mission, to something broader. We are still serving the diplomatic community, but we also believe that other businesses and professionals not of Swedish origin, “expats”, have similar needs to diplomats. They need to be aware of Swedish politics, especially where it can impact their industry, informed about economic trends, up-to-date on the key business stories and armed with the right tools to help them fit in to Swedish society.