First party leader debate focuses on organised crime

The first party leader debate of the year took place on Wednesday 17 January and focused on organised crime and the recent spate of shootings, reports Dagens Nyheter. Most party leaders agreed that focus on and investment into the police force was of great importance. Prime Minister Stefan Löfven (S) was open to the suggestion to use the military as a way of aiding the police. “It’s not my first action to put in the military, but I’m prepared to do what it takes to ensure that the seriously organized crime is eliminated,” said Löfven after the party leadership debate in the Riksdag. Moderate Party leader Ulf Kristersson said that the government had lost control and demanded stricter punishment, more cameras and more deportations. The Sweden Democrat Party leader Jimmie Åkesson said he believed that both the Social Democrats and the Moderates had done too little to fight gang crime. “I do not recognize Sweden anymore. This cannot be Sweden. But it is Sweden. The new, exciting, amazing and multicultural happiness that so many in this congregation fought for, for so long” said Åkesson during the debate. Jan Björklund, leader of the Liberals, highlighted integration and expressed his disapproval of religious free schools in the marginalised suburbs. Left Party leader Jonas Sjöstedt said that he didn’t believe that more police is the answer to curbing gang crime.

The debate can be viewed here and the simultaneous English interpretation is available  here.

 

Swedish elections

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Edgar Mannheimer is a journalist at Mundus News. He is also currently working for SVT Nyheter as an online reporter. Edgar has a passion for politics, foreign affairs and music. He grew up in Egypt, the US, Stockholm, and Jordan, following his mother’s job as a foreign correspondent. He returned to Sweden to study at Lund University, where he received a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science and Arabic/Middle Eastern Studies. During his time in Lund he was editor-in-chief of Radio UPF, the radio committee of the Association of Foreign Affairs, and also started a music program as a solo project. After Lund, he moved to Stockholm and received a Master’s degree in journalism from Stockholm University’s media institution, JMK.