Lööf (C) calls for a Lex Tayyab

The Swedish tech sector has since last year raised protests against the Swedish Migration Agency’s (Migrationsverket) tendency to deport foreign employees, whose Swedish employers have failed to live up to the body’s demands.  Among others, a dozen senior Spotify employees have been threatened with expulsion, according to Dagens Industri. In February, Mundus News reported that Spotify wrote a letter to the Ministry for Justice stating: “We are losing key people in the business, individuals who are very difficult to replace. They have their work permits cancelled because of technicalities and are forced to leave Sweden. This is unreasonable and constitutes a significant risk to our operations in Sweden”. Spotify also sent a specially composed playlist to the Ministry of Justice. When pieced together, the names of the songs on the playlist form a special message to the government: “S.O.S, Please, Stop The Madness, Change The Rules, So We Can Stay Alive, Our Business, Depends On, Smart People, Who, Come Over Here, We Need Brain, Power, Thank You, Keep Up the Good Work.”

During the autumn of 2016,  star programmer Tayyab Shabab, a Pakistani citizen and co-worker at the IT consulting company Dynamo in Stockholm, was threatened with deportation due to a temporary insurance mistake made by his former employer.  The decision was appealed by Tayyab Shabab together with the organisation Centrum för rättvisa (Centre for Justice). On Tuesday the verdict came; Tayyab Shabab and his wife will be deported and must leave Sweden within four weeks. Centre Party leader, Annie Lööf (C), says to TT: “This square system that we have in Sweden causes us to lose competitiveness” and calls for a new law to solve the issue, and suggests calling it Lex Tayyab.

 

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Jenny is a journalist at Mundus News and a contributor to the Monthly Policy Review. As well as writing for Mundus, Jenny currently works with press and culture at the Embassy of India. She has a keen interest in international relations and politics. Jenny has a degree in business administration and marketing from Nackademin and has previously worked in asset management for emerging markets.