National Council for Crime Prevention releases preliminary statistics

National Council for Crime Prevention releases preliminary statistics

On 18 January, the National Council for Crime Prevention (Brottsförebyggande rådet or Brå) released its preliminary statistics for 2017. Close to 1.51 million crimes were reported in Sweden during 2017, which is approximately 4,010 more than in 2016. In 2017, 287,000 crimes against a person were reported, which is an increase of 4%. Assaults fell by 5% to 83,400 crimes. In 2017, 486,000 robberies and muggings were reported, a decrease of 3% compared with the previous year.

The number of rapes reported increased by 10% to 7,230 reported crimes, and the number of reported crimes on sexual coercion and exploitation increased by 7%. According to Brå, it is unclear whether rapes are becoming more common in Sweden or whether it is the inclination to report them that has increased. Furthermore, two other factors affect rape statistics in Sweden: the broadened legal definition of rape brought in in 2005, and the way the reports are filed.

 

Almost one shooting per day in Sweden in 2017

Earlier in the year, Mundus News reported that there was almost one shooting per day in Sweden in 2017. With reference to police statistics, Dagens Nyheter writes that the 306 shootings in a year is a new record. The settlements between criminals were also bloodier than ever before. 41 people were killed and at least 135 were injured. In Malmö and Stockholm, the fatal violence with firearms increased sharply. But a new trend in statistics is that violence has also reached medium-sized cities. Parallel with a slight decrease in Gothenburg, there has been a sharp rise in Uppsala and Västerås, according to the newspaper.

 

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Jessica Nilsson Williams is the CEO & Founder of Mundus International. She has a long-standing interest in international affairs, having worked in the field for 20 years. She began her career as the political advisor at the U.S. Embassy in Stockholm, and then worked in the corporate- and NGOs sectors London and Singapore before returning to Stockholm. In 2011 she took up a senior role at the New Zealand Embassy before founding Mundus International in 2012.