Swedes indulge in Semla buns

Swedes indulge in Semla buns

Today is Fettisdagen (or Semmeldagen), when Swedes tuck into one of the nation’s most iconic sweet treats. Traditionally, the Semla was eaten on Fettisdagen (which literally translates as Fat Tuesday) as a feast before the Christian fasting period of Lent. Initially the buns (the plural of semla is semlor) were soaked in hot milk (known as hetvägg). Nowadays, the Swedish semla is filled with almond paste and whipped cream and come in different sizes and variations (the latest version is a taco). How best to eat them? The classic way is straight from hand to mouth but you can be more refined and use a fork. You can buy semlor in bakeries or supermarkets as well as coffee shops. This year’s winner of Stockholm’s best semla, according to Svenska Dagbladet is produced by Valhallabageriet on Valhallavägen 174 in Stockholm. You can also try baking some yourself using ToStockholm’s recipe.